Space of gong culture, VIETNAM, UNESCO ICH 2005


Space of gong culture

Inscribed in 2008 (3.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity (originally proclaimed in 2005)

Country(ies): Viet Nam
Identification
Description

Space of gong culture
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang

The cultural space of the gongs in the central highlands of Vietnam covers several provinces and seventeen Austro-Asian and Austronesian ethno-linguistic communities. Closely linked to daily life and the cycle of the seasons, their belief systems form a mystical world where the gongs produce a privileged language between men, divinities and the supernatural world. Behind every gong hides a god or goddess who is all the more powerful when the gong is older. Every family possesses at least one gong, which indicates the family’s wealth, authority and prestige, and also ensures its protection. While a range of brass instruments is used in the various ceremonies, the gong alone is present in all the rituals of community life and is the main ceremonial instrument.

The manner in which the gongs of Vietnam are played varies according to the village. Each instrumentalist carries a different gong measuring between 25 and 80 cm in diameter. From three to twelve gongs are played by the village ensembles, which are made up of men or women. Different arrangements and rhythms are adapted to the context of the ceremony, for example, the ritual sacrifice of the bullocks, the blessing of the rice or mourning rites. The gongs of this region are bought in neighbouring countries, and then tuned to the desired tone for their own use.

Economic and social transformations have drastically affected the traditional way of life of these communities and no longer provide the original context for the Gong culture. Transmission of this way of life, knowledge and know-how was severely disrupted during the decades of war during the last century.Today, this phenomenon is aggravated by the disappearance of old craftsmen and young people’s growing interest in Western culture. Stripped of their sacred significance, the gongs are sometimes sold for recycling or exchanged for other products.
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© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
© Institute of Culture and Information / Duong Thanh Giang
Video

These videos (and many more) can also be consulted through the UNESCO Archives Multimedia website
Safeguarding project (06-2007/07-2009)

Throughout the Central Highlands of Viet Nam, Gong ensembles are part of various ceremonies and closely linked to the communities’ daily life and the cycle of the seasons. The instruments, measuring 25 to 80 centimetres, are played by men as well as women.

The main goal of this project is to safeguard the space of gong culture in one province of the Central Highlands of Viet Nam, Dak Nong Province. This project has been designed to develop a network of gong practitioners and enthusiasts and to support preservation and promotion of the Central Highland’s gong performance tradition in the actual cultural context where it was born and has been maintained in social life until today. The project will directly benefit the artisans, artists, the devoted people and caretakers who have greatly contributed to the safeguarding of the gong heritage, but will also benefit the broader Vietnamese people. By mobilizing all potential sectors from society, the project seeks to provide the foundations for transmitting the skills of playing and especially of tuning gongs to young generations, and to promote awareness of the significance of intangible cultural heritage not only at the local level, but also at the national level. It will include a systematic inventory of the practitioners of gong tuning and performance and establish a policy of recognition and valorization of older master artists.

The project’s goals are to:
safeguard gong culture in the present social situation in which modernization and globalization are rapidly occurring, and young people’s aesthetic taste has increasingly been deflected from traditional heritage;
assist ICH custodians and practitioners in their efforts to safeguard and transmit this heritage to future generations and to target young audiences and potential performers;
raise the awareness of young people in the local community of the important role they should have locally and nationally in Vietnamese society at large by ensuring the conservation and transmission of the know–how of gong tuning and performing ;
identify best practices in implementing the 2003 Convention on the Safeguarding of the ICH , in respect of community involvement.

http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/index.php?lg=en&pg=00011&RL=00120

Quan Họ Bắc Ninh folk songs, UNESCO ICH 2009


Quan Họ Bắc Ninh folk songs

Inscribed in 2009 (4.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

Country(ies): Viet Nam
Identification
Description

Quan Họ Bắc Ninh folk songs
© 2008, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies

In the provinces of Bắc Ninh and Bắc Giang in northern Viet Nam, many of the villages are twinned, reinforcing their relationship through social customs such as Quan họ Bắc Ninh folk songs. The songs are performed as alternating verses between two women from one village who sing in harmony, and two men from another village who respond with similar melodies, but with different lyrics. The women traditionally wear distinctive large round hats and scarves; the men’s costumes include turbans, umbrellas and tunics. The more than 400 song lyrics, sung with 213 different melody variations, express people’s emotional states of longing and sadness upon separation, and the happiness of the meeting of lovers, but custom forbids marrying a singing partner. Quan họ singing is common at rituals, festivals, competitions and informal gatherings, where guests will perform a variety of verses for their hosts before singing farewell. Younger musicians of both sexes may practice the four singing techniques – restrained, resonant, ringing and staccato – at parties organized around singing. Quan họ songs express the spirit, philosophy and local identity of the communities in this region, and help forge social bonds within and between villages that share a cherished cultural practice.
Documents
Nomination form: English|French
Consent of communities: English
Decision 4.COM 13.76

The Committee (…) decides that [this element] satisfies the criteria for inscription on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, as follows:
R.1: Quan Họ Bắc Ninh folk songs are performed on various occasions such as the worshipping of protection gods, fertility rituals or village festivals, and are recognized and transmitted by their communities as a symbol of local and regional identity;
R.2: Inscription of the element on the Representative List would contribute to ensuring visibility and awareness of musical traditions on local, national and international levels, promoting social integration and enhancing inter-regional communication, cultural dialogue and respect for diversity;
R.3: A set of wide-ranging safeguarding measures, supported by the commitment of the community and local authorities, is proposed to ensure the viability of the element, notably the development of a cultural centre, the inclusion of songs in the local school curriculum, and the establishment of an artists’ association;
R.4: The element has been identified and nominated in a process that has widely involved at all stages the local authorities and the communities who provided their free, prior and informed consent in writing;
R.5: The element is included in the list of Vietnamese intangible heritage administered by the Viet Nam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies.
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© 2005, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2005, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2005, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2005, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2008, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2005, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2008, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2006, by Department of Cultural Heritage
© 2007, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2008, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2008, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
© 2008, by Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies
Video

© 2008 Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies

These videos (and many more) can also be consulted through the UNESCO Archives Multimedia website

http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/index.php?lg=en&pg=00011&RL=00183

Ca trù singing , UNESCO ICH 2009


Ca trù singing

Inscribed in 2009 (4.COM) on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding

Country(ies): Viet Nam
Identification
Description

Ca trù singing
© 2006. Vietnamese Institute for Musicology. Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of Vietnam

Ca trù is a complex form of sung poetry found in the north of Viet Nam using lyrics written in traditional Vietnamese poetic forms. Ca trù groups comprise three performers: a female singer who uses breathing techniques and vibrato to create unique ornamented sounds, while playing the clappers or striking a wooden box, and two instrumentalists who produce the deep tone of a three-stringed lute and the strong sounds of a praise drum. Some Ca trù performances also include dance. The varied forms of Ca trù fulfill different social purposes, including worship singing, singing for entertainment, singing in royal palaces and competitive singing. Ca trù has fifty-six different musical forms or melodies, each of which is called thể cách. Folk artists transmit the music and poems that comprise Ca trù pieces by oral and technical transmission, formerly, within their family line, but now to any who wish to learn. Ongoing wars and insufficient awareness caused Ca trù to fall into disuse during the twentieth century. Although the artists have made great efforts to transmit the old repertoire to younger generations, Ca trù is still under threat of being lost due to the diminishing number and age of practitioners.
Documents
Nomination form: English|French
Consent of communities: Vietnamese/English
Decision 4.COM 14.12

The Committee (…) decides that [this element] satisfies the criteria for inscription on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding, as follows:
U1: Ca trù singing embodies a range of musical and dance practices, as well as expertise and knowledge of poetry, constituting an identity marker of Vietnamese communities that is transmitted today by musicians and devotees dedicated to performing, teaching and developing the tradition;
U2: Le Ca trù connaît depuis quelques années un regain d’intérêt qui crée une base importante pour développer une culture durable du Ca trù dans un contexte moderne ; pourtant, la viabilité de l’élément est toujours en danger à cause du petit nombre de musiciens possédant suffisamment de compétences, de connaissances et de savoir-faire pour exécuter et enseigner le Ca trù, du manque de ressources financières pour soutenir et développer la forme, de la disparition de lieux d’exécution traditionnels et de l’évolution économique, sociale et culturelle rapide ;
U3: The proposed safeguarding measures are coherent and wide-ranging, supported by an ambitious and well-funded plan to safeguard Ca trù that can be expected to have a significant impact on the sustainability of the practice and transmission of Ca trù singing, while relying on the deep knowledge still existing in the participating communities;
U4: The element has been nominated with the free, prior and informed consent of communities, groups of musicians, their families, Ca trù clubs, and with the support of relevant Government departments, while the inscription and the proposed safeguarding measures will pay adequate respect for the customary practices and rules concerning various rituals, local beliefs and associated family matters;
U5: Ca trù singing is included in the inventory of Vietnamese musical heritage and performing arts held by the Vietnamese Institute for Musicology within the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism.
Slideshow
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© 2006. Vietnamese Institute for Musicology. Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of Vietnam
© 2006. Vietnamese Institute for Musicology. Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of Vietnam
Video

© 2008 Vietnamese Institute for Musicology, Hanoi, Vietnam

These videos (and many more) can also be consulted through the UNESCO Archives Multimedia website

http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/index.php?lg=en&pg=00011&USL=00309

Xoan singing of Phú Thọ Province, Viet Nam , ICH UNESCO 2011


Xoan singing of Phú Thọ Province, Viet Nam

Inscribed in 2011 (6.COM) on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding

Country(ies): Viet Nam
Identification
Description

Xoan singing of Phú Thọ Province, Viet Nam
© 2010. Vietnamese Institute for Musicology

Xoan singing is practised in Phú Thọ Province, Viet Nam, in the first two months of the lunar year. Traditionally, singers from Xoan guilds performed songs in sacred spaces such as temples, shrines and communal houses for the spring festivals. There are three forms of Xoan singing: worship singing for the Hùng kings and village guardian spirits; ritual singing for good crops, health and luck; and festival singing where villagers alternate male and female voices in a form of courtship. Each Xoan music guild is headed by a leader, referred to as the trùm; male instrumentalists are called kép and female singers, đào. Although only four traditional guilds remain, in recent years the singing has been taken up by clubs and other performing groups. Xoan singing is accompanied by dancing and musical instruments such as clappers and a variety of drums. The music has a spare structure with few ornamental notes and simple rhythms, and Xoan is characterized by a modulation between singers and instrumentalists at the perfect fourth interval. Knowledge, customs and techniques for singing, dancing and playing drum and clappers are traditionally transmitted orally by the guild leader. However, the majority of bearers are now over sixty years in age, and the numbers of people who appreciate Xoan singing have decreased, particularly among the younger generations.
Documents
Nomination form: English|French
Consent of communities: English/Vietnamese
Decision 6.COM 8.23

The Committee (…) decides that [this element] satisfies the criteria for inscription on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding, as follows:
U1: The residents of Phú Thọ Province recognize Xoan singing as part of their intangible cultural heritage that defines them as a community and provides them a sense of identity and continuity;
U2: Transmission is weakened because of a lack of resources and particularly due to the lengthy time needed to master the songs; the bearers are all elderly and young people migrate away from the province, while industrialization and changes in lifestyle and occupations contribute to a lack of interest;
U3: Practical measures have been taken by the communities and submitting State to strengthen the viability of Xoan singing, and viable and realistic plans are proposed for the next four years; both the communities and the State have demonstrated their commitments, with the State leading the effort;
U4: The communities concerned, practitioners and institutions participated thoroughly in the nomination process, taking an active role in the planning and implementation of safeguarding measures and committing themselves to respect and protect the sacred aspects of the element;
U5: Xoan singing is included in the inventories of the Vietnamese Institute for Musicology within the Vietnam National Academy of Music, of the Viet Nam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies within the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, and of the Department of Culture, Sports and Tourism of Phú Thọ Province.

Inscribes Xoan singing of Phú Thọ Province, Viet Nam on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding;
Invites the State Party to streamline the number of involved parties, to ensure that the community is fully

http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/index.php?lg=en&pg=00011&USL=00538

Worship of Hùng kings in Phú Thọ, ICH 2012 UNESCO


Worship of Hùng kings in Phú Thọ

Inscribed in 2012 (7.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

Country(ies): Viet Nam
Identification
Description

Worship of Hùng kings in Phú Thọ
© Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies 2011

Annually, millions of people converge on the Hùng temple at Nghĩa Lĩnh mountain in Phú Thọ province to commemorate their ancestors and pray for good weather, abundant harvests, good luck and good health. The largest ceremony, the Ancestral Anniversary festival of the Hùng Kings, is celebrated for about one week at the beginning of the third lunar month. People from surrounding villages dress in splendid costumes and compete to provide the best palanquin and most highly valued objects of worship for the key rite in which drums and gongs are conveyed to the main temple site. Communities make offerings of rice-based delicacies such as square cakes and glutinous cakes, and there are verbal and folk arts performances, bronze drum beating, Xoan singing, prayers and petitions. Secondary worship of Hùng Kings takes place at sites countrywide throughout the year. The rituals are led and maintained by the Festival Organizing Board – knowledgeable individuals of good conducts, who in turn appoint ritual committees and temple guardians to tend worship sites, instruct devotees in the key ritual acts and offer incense. The tradition embodies spiritual solidarity and provides an occasion to acknowledge national origins and sources of Vietnamese cultural and moral identity.
Documents
Nomination form: English|French
Consent of communities: English|French||Vietnamese
Decision 7.COM 11.36

The Committee (…) decides that [this element] satisfies the criteria for inscription on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, as follows:
R.1: The worship of Hùng Kings includes ceremonies, offerings, pilgrimages and a range of performances in more than a hundred villages in Phú Thọ Province and elsewhere in the country; this practice provides a sense of reverence for ancestors that in turn enhances the feeling of pride and social cohesiveness;
R.2: Inscription of the worship of Hùng Kings on the Representative List could contribute to the recognition of the importance of ancestor worship in many other countries, thus encouraging communities to recognize commonalities while promoting respect for cultural diversity;
R.3: A series of safeguarding measures including research, education, promotion, and awareness raising are supported by the budget of the State and local authorities and aim to ensure the viability of the practice; they also respect the sacredness of the ritual and customary restrictions on access to certain aspects;
R.4: Representatives of villages, communes and districts as well as members of

Festival Management Boards have taken an active part in the preparation of the nomination and they have expressed their free, prior and informed consent;
R.5: The worship of Hùng Kings in Phú Thọ has been included since 2010 in the inventory of the Viet

http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/index.php?lg=en&pg=00011&RL=00735

Viet Nam – Information related to Intangible Cultural Heritage


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See all elements inscribed.2012

Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Worship of Hùng kings in Phú Thọ Viet Nam

2011

List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding
Xoan singing of Phú Thọ Province, Viet Nam Viet Nam

2010

Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Gióng festival of Phù Ðông and Sóc temples Viet Nam

2009

List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding
Ca trù singing Viet Nam

Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Quan Họ Bắc Ninh folk songs Viet Nam

2008

Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Nha Nhac, Vietnamese court music Viet Nam

Space of gong culture Viet Nam

What is Intangible Cultural Heritage?
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14/17-03-2001, Turin
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International Round Table: Intangible Cultural Heritage, Working Definitions

20/23-10-2004, Nara
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International Conference on « The Safeguarding of Tangible and Intangible Cultural Heritage: Towards an Integrated Approach »…

The term ‘cultural heritage’ has changed content considerably in recent decades, partially owing to the instruments developed by UNESCO. Cultural heritage does not end at monuments and collections of objects. It also includes traditions or living expressions inherited from our ancestors and passed on to our descendants, such as oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, rituals, festive events, knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe or the knowledge and skills to produce traditional crafts.

While fragile, intangible cultural heritage is an important factor in maintaining cultural diversity in the face of growing globalization. An understanding of the intangible cultural heritage of different communities helps with intercultural dialogue, and encourages mutual respect for other ways of life.

The importance of intangible cultural heritage is not the cultural manifestation itself but rather the wealth of knowledge and skills that is transmitted through it from one generation to the next. The social and economic value of this transmission of knowledge is relevant for minority groups and for mainstream social groups within a State, and is as important for developing States as for developed ones.

Infokit 2009 – “What is intangible cultural heritage?” English|French|Spanish
© UNESCO

Intangible cultural heritage is:
Traditional, contemporary and living at the same time: intangible cultural heritage does not only represent inherited traditions from the past but also contemporary rural and urban practices in which diverse cultural groups take part;
Inclusive: we may share expressions of intangible cultural heritage that are similar to those practised by others. Whether they are from the neighbouring village, from a city on the opposite side of the world, or have been adapted by peoples who have migrated and settled in a different region, they all are intangible cultural heritage: they have been passed from one generation to another, have evolved in response to their environments and they contribute to giving us a sense of identity and continuity, providing a link from our past, through the present, and into our future. Intangible cultural heritage does not give rise to questions of whether or not certain practices are specific to a culture. It contributes to social cohesion, encouraging a sense of identity and responsibility which helps individuals to feel part of one or different communities and to feel part of society at large;
Representative: intangible cultural heritage is not merely valued as a cultural good, on a comparative basis, for its exclusivity or its exceptional value. It thrives on its basis in communities and depends on those whose knowledge of traditions, skills and customs are passed on to the rest of the community, from generation to generation, or to other communities;
Community-based: intangible cultural heritage can only be heritage when it is recognized as such by the communities, groups or individuals that create, maintain and transmit it – without their recognition, nobody else can decide for them that a given expression or practice is their heritage.

MINH AN : Đờn ca tài tử từ đồng ruộng ra thế giới, VIETNAM 2013


Đờn ca tài tử từ đồng ruộng ra thế giới
Thứ bảy, 09/02/2013, 10:55 (GMT+7)

Đờn ca tài tử – loại hình nghệ thuật được nhiều thế hệ người Việt yêu thích đang chờ được Tổ chức Giáo dục, Khoa học và Văn hóa của Liên hiệp quốc (UNESCO), công nhận là di sản văn hóa phi vật thể đại diện của nhân loại.

Du khách nước ngoài thích thú khám phá đàn bầu – nhạc cụ không thể thiếu trong nghệ thuật đờn ca tài tử. Ảnh: AN DUNG

Không chỉ ở những vùng quê sông nước, những dải cù lao cây xanh trái ngọt, không chỉ quanh quẩn ở bờ tre ruộng lúa, giờ đây đờn ca tài tử còn là nét văn hóa đặc trưng, là một trong những món ăn tinh thần ngày càng thấm đẫm với người dân chốn thị thành. PGS.TS Lê Văn Toàn, Viện trưởng Viện Âm nhạc quốc gia Việt Nam, cho biết “Trong quá trình xây dựng hồ sơ, chúng tôi quyết định giữ nguyên chữ “đờn” (thay vì chuyển sang đàn theo chuẩn từ điển tiếng Việt) để đảm bảo bản sắc văn hóa riêng của phương ngữ Nam bộ. Nghệ thuật đờn ca tài tử có sức sống mạnh mẽ và yếu tố “mở” theo sự phát triển của xã hội, đó chính là nét riêng đặc sắc của loại hình nghệ thuật này. Việc trình hồ sơ để UNESCO công nhận đờn ca tài tử là di sản văn hóa phi vật thể của nhân loại sẽ góp phần bảo tồn, phát triển loại hình văn hóa này cho muôn đời sau”.

Theo GS.TS Trần Văn Khê, từ những năm 1960, nghệ thuật đờn ca tài tử của Việt Nam đã được giới thiệu với UNESCO. GS.TS Trần Văn Khê cho hay, khoảng năm 1962 ông đã nhờ nhạc sĩ Nguyễn Hữu Ba thu âm một đĩa đờn ca tài tử để giới thiệu với UNESCO. Năm 1963, UNESCO đã mời ông và nghệ nhân dân gian Bạch Huệ thu âm một đĩa nhạc gồm 11 bài theo thể loại đờn ca tài tử có nhan đề Viet Nam traditions of the South, được phát hành dưới thương hiệu Tuyển tập UNESCO (UNESCO Collection).

Năm 1972, một đĩa tương tự được thực hiện với phần trình tấu của GS.TS Trần Văn Khê và nhạc sư Nguyễn Vĩnh Bảo. Ngoài ra, năm 1972, Cocora Radio France – một cơ quan truyền thông của Pháp – đã mời ông cùng nhạc sư Vĩnh Bảo và năm 1994 tiếp tục mời nghệ sĩ đàn tranh Hải Phượng sang thu âm hai đĩa đờn ca tài tử. Cả hai đĩa này đều nằm trong danh sách đĩa nhạc bán chạy nhất và nhận được giải Phê bình âm nhạc của Pháp ngay trong năm phát hành.

Năm 1970, thêm một “dấu ấn mới” về đờn ca tài tử được ghi dấu khi nhạc sư Nguyễn Vĩnh Bảo được Trường Đại học Illinois mời sang Mỹ tham gia giảng dạy bộ môn âm nhạc dân tộc Việt Nam cùng với GS.TS Trần Văn Khê. Đó là chưa kể đến hàng chục chương trình giao lưu văn hóa của các nghệ nhân, các CLB đờn ca tài tử trong nước với bạn bè quốc tế, cùng hàng ngàn buổi giảng dạy, giới thiệu và biểu diễn âm nhạc truyền thống Việt Nam, nghệ thuật đờn ca tài tử của GS.TS Trần Văn Khê tại hàng chục quốc gia trên thế giới.

GS.TS Trần Văn Khê cho rằng, nghệ thuật đờn ca tài tử hấp dẫn bởi tính vừa hàn lâm vừa đại chúng, từ lâu đã được đông đảo bạn bè thế giới quan tâm tìm hiểu. Thế nên, việc trình hồ sơ đờn ca tài tử để UNESCO vinh danh là di sản văn hóa phi vật thể đại diện của nhân loại là việc phải làm để bảo tồn nghệ thuật truyền thống của dân tộc. Chúng ta cùng chờ tin vui cho đờn ca tài tử một ngày không xa!

Minh An

http://www.sggp.org.vn/vanhoavannghe/2013/2/311233/

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NGUYỄN ANH : Chuẩn bị lập hồ sơ về Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử , VIETNAM 2011


http://hanoi.vietnamplus.vn/Home/Chuan-bi-lap-ho-so-ve-Nghe-thuat-Don-ca-tai-tu/20108/2565.vnplus

 

Chuẩn bị lập hồ sơ về Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử

Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử gần gũi trong các sinh hoạt văn hóa của người Nam Bộ. (Nguồn: Internet)

Ông Nguyễn Thế Hùng, Cục trưởng Cục Di sản Văn hóa khẳng định trước ngày 31/3/2011 sẽ hoàn chỉnh hồ sơ trình UNESCO và nếu mọi thủ tục đều đáp ứng đầy đủ yêu cầu của Ủy ban Bảo vệ Di sản của UNESCO thì đến tháng 11/2012 “Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử” sẽ chính thức trở thành Di sản Văn hóa Phi vật thể của nhân loại.

Để chuẩn bị cho việc xây dựng hồ sơ, trong hai ngày 20 và 21/8, tại Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh, Cục Di sản Văn hóa (Bộ Văn hóa, Thể thao và Du lịch), Cơ quan đại diện Bộ Văn hóa, Thể thao và Du lịch và Viện Âm nhạc (Học viện Âm nhạc quốc gia Việt Nam) phối hợp tổ chức tập huấn phổ biến thông tư kiểm kê di sản văn hóa và hướng dẫn kiểm kê nghệ thuật đờn ca tài tử cho cán bộ chuyên môn của 21 Sở Văn hóa, Thể thao và Du lịch tỉnh, thành khu vực phía Nam.

Theo nhận định của Học viện Âm nhạc Quốc gia Việt Nam, căn cứ khoa học để xây dựng hồ sơ đề cử “Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử” vào Danh sách Di sản Văn hóa phi vật thể đại diện của nhân loại chính là đất nước Việt Nam có bề dày mấy ngàn năm lịch sử, gìn giữ những giá trị văn hóa phi vật thể tiêu biểu qua các thời kỳ thông qua việc bảo tồn và phát huy giá trị.

Bên cạnh đó, chúng ta có những cơ sở pháp lý rất chặt chẽ giúp cho việc đề cử được thuận lợi, đó là Luật Di sản Văn hóa; Luật sửa đổi, bổ sung một số điều của Luật Di sản Văn hóa; Công ước về Bảo vệ Di sản Văn hóa phi vật thể năm 2003 của UNESCO.

Cục Di sản Văn hóa đã kết luận: “Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử” có nhiều ưu thế hơn so với các loại hình nghệ thuật phi vật thể khác đó là phạm vi hoạt động khá rộng (21 tỉnh thành trải từ miền Đông sang miền Tây Nam Bộ).

Chính vì vậy, công tác giữ gìn và phát huy bên cạnh yếu tố thuận lợi cũng không ít những khó khăn. Việc đề nghị đưa bộ môn nghệ thuật này trở thành di sản đại diện nhân loại được xem là cấp bách, giúp cho việc giữ gìn, phát huy được thuận lợi hơn.
Ngày 14/4/2010, Văn phòng Chính phủ đã ra thông báo số 2496/ VPCP-KGVX nêu ý kiến của Thủ tướng đồng ý cho việc lập hồ sơ trình UNESCO đưa “Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử” vào Danh sách Di sản văn hóa phi vật thể đại diện cho nhân loại.

Các nhà khoa học đều cho rằng, việc đề cử này là một việc làm thiết thực, có ý nghĩa về nhiều mặt nhằm tôn vinh những giá trị văn hóa của đất nước, góp phần vào việc xây dựng nền văn hóa Việt Nam tiên tiến, đậm đà bản sắc dân tộc.

Ngày 5/8/2010, tại Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh, Bộ Văn hóa, Thể thao và Du lịch cũng đã chính thức công bố quyết định về việc đề cử “Nghệ thuật Đờn ca tài tử” vào Danh sách Di sản Văn hóa phi vật thể đại diện của nhân loại.

Nguyễn Anh (Vietnam+)

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