BBC RADIO 3 WORLD ROUTE : TRAN QUANG HAI IN SAIGON , UK 2003


 

Image for Tran Quang Hai in Saigon

Tran Quang Hai in Saigon

Availability:
over a year left to play
Duration:
1 hour
First broadcast:
Saturday 04 January 2003

Lucy and her guides, Vietnamese musicians, Tran Quang Hai and Bach Yen, are in Saigon –the first time these two musicians have stepped back into the city of their birth after 41 years in exile. Along the way, she hears ritual music played on two drums, representing Yin and Yang. She also meets Bach Yen, and discovers more about his return to Saigon after being in exile and how she is affected by the melodies of ritual music she last heard as a child.

Music and featured items

23 items

Timings (where shown) are from the start of the programme in hours and minutes
  • Music Played


    • Bach Yen Au o vi dan (Trad)

  • Lucy and her guides in Saigon.

    Lucy and her guides, Vietnamese musicians, Tran Quang Hai and Bach Yen, visit Saigon.

  • Music Played


    • Nyat Dung Dan Gao Improvisation


    • Nyat Dung Bong Ba Bong tu – fiddle version (trad)

  • Ritual music played on drums.

    Lucy hears ritual music played on two drums, representing Yin and Yang.

  • Music Played


    • Nyat Dung and his group Untitled percussion piece (trad)


    • Nyat Dung and his group Bong Ba Bong tu – oboe version (Trad)

  • Bach Yen returns to Saigon.

    Lucy talks to Bach Yen about returning to Saigon after being in exile.

  • Music Played


    • Minh Vuong/Le Thuy Xe hoa cach biet (Trad)

  • French influenced music.

    Lucy learns how her guide’s exile in France influenced his musical style.

  • Music Played


    • Thanh Long Ai ve Song Tuong


    • Hai Phuong Binh Ban Van (Trad)

  • Pre-war Vietnam music

    Lucy visits a club which specialises in music from the time before the Vietnam War.

  • Music Played


    • Hai Phuong and Thuy Hoan Beo dat may troi (Trad)

  • 17 stringed zither

    Lucy hears the music of the 17 stringed zither played by virtuoso Hai Phuong.

  • Music Played


    • Hai Phuong and Thuy Hoan Qua can gio bay (Trad)


    • Hai Phuong Ly lu la (Trad)

  • Vietnam cuisine

    Lucy discovers more about Vietnam cuisine including frogs’ legs and dog meat.

  • Music Played


    • Hai Phuong Untitled Bamboo Song

  • Tran Quong Hai interview

    Lucy chats with Tran Quong Hai after 41 years of exile.

  • Music Played


    • Hai Phuong Arrival of Spring (Trad)


    • Huong Thanh/Dominique Borker Scent of my childhood


    • Nyat Dung Dan Gao Improvisation

Broadcasts

BBC RADIO 3 WORLD ROUTE : TRAN QUANG HAI IN HANOI , UK 2003


Vietnam

Lucy Duran presents two programmes from Vietnam. In the first she is joined by Vietnamese musician Tran Quang Hai who makes the long journey home for the first time after 41 years of exile in Paris. They visit the bustling capital Hanoi, a city brimming with traditional music and culture.

In the second programme they visit the Southern capital where Hai was brought up: Saigon or Ho Chi Minh City. As well as sampling the vibrant night life they hear traditional ritual music and visit one of the youngest and most famous zither players in Vietnam.

Last on

Tran Quang Hai in Saigon

2/2. Lucy and her guides visit Saigon, the first time they have been back for 41 years.

Sat 3 Jan 2004 15:00 BBC Radio 3

See all previous episodes from World Routes

Image for Tran Quang Hai in Hanoi

Play now 60 mins

Tran Quang Hai in Hanoi

Availability:
over a year left to play
Duration:
1 hour
First broadcast:
Saturday 28 December 2002

Lucy Duran presented two programmes from Vietnam. In the first she is joined by Vietnamese musician Tran Quang Hai who makes the long journey home for the first time after 41 years of exile in Paris. They visit the bustling capital Hanoi, a city brimming with traditional music and culture.

Music and featured items

20 items

Timings (where shown) are from the start of the programme in hours and minutes
  • Lucy Duran visits Hanoi

    Lucy Duran in the centre of Hanoi with Vietnamese musicians Tran Quang Hai and Bach Yen.

  • Music Played


    • Trad folk theatre from North Vietnam Title unknown

      Orchestra: of the National Conservatory of Music, Hanoi

  • National Conservatory of Music

    Lucy visits the National Conservatory of Music where she hears some folk theatre music.

  • Music Played


    • Ngo cha My In Love for Ever

      BBC Recording


    • Tan Twee Southern Spring (Trad)

      BBC Recording

  • 16 string zither and moon lute

    Lucy hears a 16 string zither and moon lute playing a mode which expresses sadness.

  • Music Played


    • Tan Twee Training with 5 modes (Trad)

      BBC Recording

  • Bach Yen’s western style hit

    Bach Yen explain why music from before the Vietnam War is still popular.

  • Traditional folk songs in Vietnam

    Lucy visits a music shop where she hears about the importance of traditional folk songs.

  • Music Played


    • Quang Vinh/Thuy Huong Con Duyen

      BBC Recording

    • Image for Thanh Lam

      Thanh Lam Cam Tay mua he

      BBC Recording

  • Water Puppet Theatre

    Lucy visits the Vietnamese Water Puppet Theatre.

  • Music Played


    • The Thang Long Water Puppet Troupe Orchestra Music from the Vietnamese Water Puppet theatre:

      BBC Recording


    • The Hanoi Ca Tru Thai Ha Ensemble Gui Thu

      BBC Recording

  • Ca Tru tradition love song

    Lucy hears the extraordinary vocal techniques of a 9 year old girl singing a love song.

  • Music Played


    • The Hanoi Ca Tru Thai Ha Ensemble Xam hue Tinh

      BBC Recording

  • The Ca Tru tradition

    Lucy learns more about the Ca Tru tradition from one its most famous singers.

  • Music Played


    • The Hanoi Ca Tru Thai Ha Ensemble Chi nam nhi

      BBC Recording

  • Reflections on Vietnam

    Lucy and her guide Tran Quang reflect on his feelings on returning to Vietnam.

  • Music Played


    • Huong Thanh/Nguyen Le/Dominque Borker/Duong Tam/Hao Nhien Pham Lovers on the mountain (Bai Ca Tren Nui)

      BBC Recording

Broadcasts

MONDOMIX: TRAN QUANG HAI : biographie, FRANCE, 2008


Tran Quang Hai

Submitted by Mondomix on lun, 10/27/2008 – 23:00
artiste – Musique
Tran Quang Hai

Né en 1944 dans la banlieue de Saigon, élevé dans le respect et la pratique de la musique classique occidentale, diplômé du conservatoire après avoir rejoint son père en France en 1961, Tran Quang Hai se reconvertit. Il opte définitivement pour les musiques traditionnelles vietnamiennes, tout en participant à la naissance du mouvement folk français. Musicologue, chercheur au CNRS, il maîtrise une quinzaine d’instruments, dont la cithare à seize cordes, la vièle à deux cordes et les cliquettes à sapèques (sinh tiên). Il réalise de nombreux enregistrements de musique traditionnelle vietnamienne et pratique également le chant diphonique, sujet de ses recherches au CNRS (une tradition vocale qui n’est pas présente au Vietnam, mais en Mongolie et à Touva).

http://www.mondomix.com/fr/e/tran_quang_hai

DVD Quan họ Bắc Ninh – 05 – Chúc mừng thượng đẳng tối linh , VIETNAM


Mise en ligne le 13 févr. 2010

Quan họ singing is a Vietnamese folk music style characterized both by its antiphonal nature, with alternating groups of female and male singers issuing musical challenges and responses, and by the fact that most of the songs in the repertoire deal with topics of love and sentimentality as experienced by young adults.

Quan ho is recognised as the Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO in 2009.

The quan họ style originated in what is now Bắc Ninh Province and was first recorded in the 13th century, and has traditionally been associated with the spring festivals that follow the celebration of Tết (the Vietnamese New Year). Historically, the singing began on the evening before the festival, but today it is much more common for the singing to occur on the main day of the festival. In general, an initial “challenge phrase” (câu ra) from the known body of songs is sung by a pair of female singers, following which a pair of male singers will respond by selecting and singing a “matching phrase” (câu đối), which must repeat the melody of the challenge phrase. Once they are finished, the order is reversed, and the men will issue their own challenge phrase with a different melody. While in the past the singing was unaccompanied, it is common today for the singers to be accompanied by instruments, whether traditional Vietnamese instruments or modern ones such as electric keyboards.

There are a huge number of quan họ melodies, with thousands of different songs having been recorded and written down in score form.

(From Wikipedia)

DVD Quan họ Bắc Ninh – 04 – Thoạt chân em bước vào đền , VIETNAM


Mise en ligne le 13 févr. 2010

Quan họ singing is a Vietnamese folk music style characterized both by its antiphonal nature, with alternating groups of female and male singers issuing musical challenges and responses, and by the fact that most of the songs in the repertoire deal with topics of love and sentimentality as experienced by young adults.

Quan ho is recognised as the Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO in 2009.

The quan họ style originated in what is now Bắc Ninh Province and was first recorded in the 13th century, and has traditionally been associated with the spring festivals that follow the celebration of Tết (the Vietnamese New Year). Historically, the singing began on the evening before the festival, but today it is much more common for the singing to occur on the main day of the festival. In general, an initial “challenge phrase” (câu ra) from the known body of songs is sung by a pair of female singers, following which a pair of male singers will respond by selecting and singing a “matching phrase” (câu đối), which must repeat the melody of the challenge phrase. Once they are finished, the order is reversed, and the men will issue their own challenge phrase with a different melody. While in the past the singing was unaccompanied, it is common today for the singers to be accompanied by instruments, whether traditional Vietnamese instruments or modern ones such as electric keyboards.

There are a huge number of quan họ melodies, with thousands of different songs having been recorded and written down in score form.

(From Wikipedia)

DVD Quan họ Bắc Ninh – 03 – Đôi bên bàn định đã lâu , VIETNAM


Mise en ligne le 13 févr. 2010

Quan họ singing is a Vietnamese folk music style characterized both by its antiphonal nature, with alternating groups of female and male singers issuing musical challenges and responses, and by the fact that most of the songs in the repertoire deal with topics of love and sentimentality as experienced by young adults.

Quan ho is recognised as the Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO in 2009.

The quan họ style originated in what is now Bắc Ninh Province and was first recorded in the 13th century, and has traditionally been associated with the spring festivals that follow the celebration of Tết (the Vietnamese New Year). Historically, the singing began on the evening before the festival, but today it is much more common for the singing to occur on the main day of the festival. In general, an initial “challenge phrase” (câu ra) from the known body of songs is sung by a pair of female singers, following which a pair of male singers will respond by selecting and singing a “matching phrase” (câu đối), which must repeat the melody of the challenge phrase. Once they are finished, the order is reversed, and the men will issue their own challenge phrase with a different melody. While in the past the singing was unaccompanied, it is common today for the singers to be accompanied by instruments, whether traditional Vietnamese instruments or modern ones such as electric keyboards.

There are a huge number of quan họ melodies, with thousands of different songs having been recorded and written down in score form.

(From Wikipedia)

This blog is focused on Trân Quang Hai