Ca trù singing , UNESCO Intangible cultural heritage 2009, VIETNAM


Mise en ligne le 26 sept. 2009

UNESCO: Urgent Safeguarding List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity – 2009
URL: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/USL…
Description: Ca trù is a complex form of sung poetry found in the north of Viet Nam using lyrics written in traditional Vietnamese poetic forms. Ca trù groups comprise three performers: a female singer who uses breathing techniques and vibrato to create unique ornamented sounds, while playing the clappers or striking a wooden box, and two instrumentalists who produce the deep tone of a three-stringed lute and the strong sounds of a praise drum. Some Ca trù performances also include dance. The varied forms of Ca trù fulfill different social purposes, including worship singing, singing for entertainment, singing in royal palaces and competitive singing. Ca trù has fifty-six different musical forms or melodies, each of which is called thể cách. Folk artists transmit the music and poems that comprise Ca trù pieces by oral and technical transmission, formerly, within their family line, but now to any who wish to learn. Ongoing wars and insufficient awareness caused Ca trù to fall into disuse during the twentieth century. Although the artists have made great efforts to transmit the old repertoire to younger generations, Ca trù is still under threat of being lost due to the diminishing number and age of practitioners.
Country(ies): Viet Nam
© 2008 Vietnamese Institute for Musicology, Hanoi, Vietnam

Quan Họ Bắc Ninh folk songs , UNESCO intangible cultural heritage 2009, VIETNAM


Mise en ligne le 25 sept. 2009

UNESCO: Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity – 2009
URL: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/RL/…
Description: In the provinces of Bắc Ninh and Bắc Giang in northern Viet Nam, many of the villages are twinned, reinforcing their relationship through social customs such as Quan họ Bắc Ninh folk songs. The songs are performed as alternating verses between two women from one village who sing in harmony, and two men from another village who respond with similar melodies, but with different lyrics. The women traditionally wear distinctive large round hats and scarves; the mens costumes include turbans, umbrellas and tunics. The more than 400 song lyrics, sung with 213 different melody variations, express peoples emotional states of longing and sadness upon separation, and the happiness of the meeting of lovers, but custom forbids marrying a singing partner. Quan họ singing is common at rituals, festivals, competitions and informal gatherings, where guests will perform a variety of verses for their hosts before singing farewell. Younger musicians of both sexes may practice the four singing techniques restrained, resonant, ringing and staccato at parties organized around singing. Quan họ songs express the spirit, philosophy and local identity of the communities in this region, and help forge social bonds within and between villages that share a cherished cultural practice.
Country(ies): Viet Nam
© 2008 Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies

Quan Họ Bắc Ninh folk songs , UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage 2009, VIETNAM


Mise en ligne le 22 déc. 2009

UNESCO: Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity – 2009
URL: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/RL/…
Description: In the provinces of Bắc Ninh and Bắc Giang in northern Viet Nam, many of the villages are twinned, reinforcing their relationship through social customs such as Quan họ Bắc Ninh folk songs. The songs are performed as alternating verses between two women from one village who sing in harmony, and two men from another village who respond with similar melodies, but with different lyrics. The women traditionally wear distinctive large round hats and scarves; the mens costumes include turbans, umbrellas and tunics. The more than 400 song lyrics, sung with 213 different melody variations, express peoples emotional states of longing and sadness upon separation, and the happiness of the meeting of lovers, but custom forbids marrying a singing partner. Quan họ singing is common at rituals, festivals, competitions and informal gatherings, where guests will perform a variety of verses for their hosts before singing farewell. Younger musicians of both sexes may practice the four singing techniques restrained, resonant, ringing and staccato at parties organized around singing. Quan họ songs express the spirit, philosophy and local identity of the communities in this region, and help forge social bonds within and between villages that share a cherished cultural practice.
Country(ies): Viet Nam
© 2008 Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies

Duration: 01:05:00 – Support: DVD (0018300010)

Ca trù singing , UNESCO INTANGIBLE CULTURAL HERITAGE 2009, VIETNAM


Uploaded on Dec 22, 2009

UNESCO: Urgent Safeguarding List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity – 2009
URL: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/USL…
Description: Ca trù is a complex form of sung poetry found in the north of Viet Nam using lyrics written in traditional Vietnamese poetic forms. Ca trù groups comprise three performers: a female singer who uses breathing techniques and vibrato to create unique ornamented sounds, while playing the clappers or striking a wooden box, and two instrumentalists who produce the deep tone of a three-stringed lute and the strong sounds of a praise drum. Some Ca trù performances also include dance. The varied forms of Ca trù fulfill different social purposes, including worship singing, singing for entertainment, singing in royal palaces and competitive singing. Ca trù has fifty-six different musical forms or melodies, each of which is called thể cách. Folk artists transmit the music and poems that comprise Ca trù pieces by oral and technical transmission, formerly, within their family line, but now to any who wish to learn. Ongoing wars and insufficient awareness caused Ca trù to fall into disuse during the twentieth century. Although the artists have made great efforts to transmit the old repertoire to younger generations, Ca trù is still under threat of being lost due to the diminishing number and age of practitioners.
Country(ies): Viet Nam
© 2008 Vietnamese Institute for Musicology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Duration: 01:01:44 – Support: DVD (0030900017)

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