Tag Archives: overtone singing

Sylvain Trias / Overtone & Jew’s harp Medley


Ajoutée le 25 mai 2014
Here is a small collection of live records – though some major studied styles are missing (rajasthani and norwegian).

00:00 – Traditional Altai tune
00:42 – Dotar and Tuva throat singing
02:46 – Borbagnadyr
03:35 – Siberian Khomus (jharp)
06:19 – Columbian Sempruna (jharp)
07:35 – Vietnamese DanMoi (jharp)
08:21 – Indonesian Genggong (jharp)
09:27 – Nepalese Murchunga (jharp)

For those interested, read my thesis “Helmholtz and Coupled Resonator Acoustics in Jew’s Harp Playing” at http://www.sylvaintrias.com

I regularly give lectures, play on stage and provide group/individual courses. For any question or request, please contact me at ethno.trias@gmail.com

Enjoy the listening!

——
Research Master Degree in Ethnomusicology
Graduated from Telemark University College, Norway.
Board Member of International Jew’s Harp Society.

Trân Quang Hai thinks about Sylvain Trias :

“Sylvain TRIAS was my student at the beginning and has become my good friend since . He is a virtuoso of Jew’s harp, mastering different styles from Norway, Rajasthan, Vietnam. Furthermore, he has mastered the technique of overtone singing. He obtained the master degree in Norway with the topic “Helmholtz and Coupled Resonator Acoustics in Jew’s Harp Playing”. This video presents his general research on overtone singing and jew’s harps” .

WORKSHOP OF OVERTONE SINGING by M° TRAN QUANG HAI in Cosenza Vecchia and Crotone, ITALY, 30 & 31 May 2014


WORKSHOP OF OVERTONE SINGING by

M° TRAN QUANG HAI tran quang hai overtone singing

 in Cosenza Vecchia and Crotone, ITALY, 30 & 31 May 2014

 These 2 workshops are organized by Micòl and Lorenzo

 WStranquanghai

 1)  friday 30 th May 2014

From 9:30 to 12:30  ; then from 15:00 to 18:00

    Place : Il giardino di Shiva

    Address : Via casini 31   City : Cosenza Vecchia

   organizer  Micòl 3333187086 Lorenzo 3471797345

2)  Saturday 31 may 2014

from 9:30 to 12:30  and from 15:00 to 18:00

     Place : Centro Parvati

     Address : Via Tommaso Campanella 9 City : Crotone

     organizer Micòl 333 3187086

 

Description

Workshop Intensivo di CANTO ARMONICO con Tran Quang HaiIl canto armonico, detto anche canto difonico, diplofonico e triplofonico, ed in inglese “overtone singing”, è una tecnica nella quale il cantante sfrutta le risonanze che si creano nel tratto vocale (tra le corde vocali e la bocca) per far risaltare gli armonici presenti nella voce. In questo modo una singola voce può produrre simultaneamente due o più suoni distinti.
Khoomei o il canto di gola è il nome usato in Tuva e in Mongolia per descrivere diversi stili di canto e tecniche in cui un solo cantante produce contemporaneamente due (o più) toni distinti; il più basso è il tono fondamentale della voce e suona come un ronzio costante simile al timbro della cornamusa scozzese, il secondo corrisponde ad una delle parziali armoniche ed è come un fischio che risuona a tonalità molto elevate. 

Durante il workshop, Tran Quang Hai insegnerà le 2 tecniche di base del canto armonico:

– Tecnica di una cavità orale con il registro basso degli armonici;
– Tecnica di due cavità della bocca con una maggiore serie di sfumature.
– Esercizi di improvvisazione e creazione collettiva
– Esercizi per ridurre il suono fondamentale
– Imparare ad ascoltare il proprio tono al fine di creare piccole melodie

Image
Tran Quang Hai
Raffinato interprete delle tradizioni musicali dell’Estremo Oriente, maestro di artisti come Demetrio Stratos, Tran Quang Hai è considerato il più grande specialista del mondo di canto difonico (overtones), tecnica vocale di origine sciamanica che permette l’emissione simultanea di due note, diffusa in Mongolia, in Siberia e in Sudafrica.
Tran Quang Hai proviene da una famiglia di cinque generazioni di musicisti.
tranquanghai.info

MIGUEL GONZALEZ JR. : THE MAN WHO BROUGHT TUVAN THROAT SINGING TO THE WORLD / KONGAR – OL ONDAR (died in july 2013)


12:22 pm HKT
Aug 23, 2013

ARTS & CULTURE

The Man Who Brought Tuvan Throat Singing to the World

    • By

 

 

Ilya Naymushin/Reuters

Kongar-ol Ondar performing at the 2nd International Festival of World Music in Russia in July 2004.

During his life, Kongar-ol Ondar brought global exposure to the obscure art of Tuvan throat singing through his appearance in an Oscar-nominated documentary and a slew of performances that charmed the West.

Mr. Ondar was a star in his homeland of Tuva, the Russian republic that had for centuries been part of Mongolia and briefly a Manchurian territory until it was annexed by the former Soviet Union. The tiny area in southern Siberia, now part of the Russian federation, is known for two things: the monument near its capital, Kyzyl, marking the geographical center of Asia, and throat singing.

Overtone singing, as the vocalization is more widely known, is found in pockets around the world, but Tuvan throat singing is particularly well-known now, thanks to Mr. Ondar, who died July 25 at the age of 51 after, according to news reports, emergency surgery to treat a brain hemorrhage.

Throat singers manipulate their vocal chords to make audible the overtones of the notes they hit, producing more than one pitch at a time. The harmonic effect is mesmerizing — most first-time listeners are astonished to learn the sound is produced by a human.

Mr. Ondar, on a trip to California with Tuvan singers in the early 1990s, met an American blues singer who had taught himself to throat sing. He encouraged the blind American, Paul Pena, to travel to Tuva for its annual throat-singing symposium.

Mr. Pena made the trip in 1995, along with Roko and Adrian Belic, two American brothers who filmed the unlikely adventure. Their documentary, “Genghis Blues,” was released in 1999 and nominated for an Academy Award the next year for best documentary. (It lost out to “One Day in September,” about the terrorist attack at the 1972 Munich Olympics.)

Mr. Ondar, who had taken on a role as something of a cultural ambassador for Tuva, attended that red-carpet Oscar ceremony, dressed in his traditional nomadic herder attire, and displayed the natural charisma that shone so brightly in the film.

“Genghis Blues” is explicitly about Mr. Pena’s journey from San Francisco to a land as foreign as any in the 20th century. But once the story leaves the U.S., Mr. Ondar, like an overtone that unexpectedly makes itself an equal part of the harmony, whisks the audience on horseback into the scenic Asian steppe.

Mr. Ondar’s ebullience stands in stark contrast to Mr. Pena’s occasional spasms of depression and panic. He leads with his warm personality and a smile as wide as the Tuvan sky, and when Mr. Pena hits the depths of his sadness, Mr. Ondar brings him back with the one passion both men share: music.

As part of his effort to nurture and spread Tuvan culture, Mr. Ondar performed for a variety of other Western musicians during the 1990s, including Frank Zappa and Ry Cooder, and brought his art to mass media with an appearance on “The Late Show With David Letterman.” But his collaboration with Mr. Pena illustrates best the exotic sound of throat singing and the electric connection the two men had.

Roko Belic, who directed “Genghis Blues,” reminisced in an email to the Journal about his experience with the celebrated musician, whom he helped to put on the world-wide stage:

When I heard the news of Kongar-ol’s death it felt is as if a piece of the world had been broken off and lost.  I first got to know him in December 1994, when I knocked on his door at 1 a.m. His friend in America, Ralph Leighton, had given me his address, and being a friend of a friend was all that was needed for Kongar-ol to welcome me like a brother. He woke up his wife and children to meet me and then gave me tea, fed me and made a bed for me.

A couple days later I learned what kind of teacher Kongar-ol was. The temperature was minus 50 degrees centigrade, and he told me we had to go for a drive. We traveled for three hours through a blizzard in his Lada and eventually came upon a farmhouse. Kongar-ol spoke to a woman there, and a few minutes later came out of the house with an 11-year-old boy. On the drive back to Kyzyl, Kongar-ol explained that this boy was a student of his. The boy had not returned to school in Kyzyl after a recent holiday, and that’s why we had to go and retrieve him. I had never seen a teacher so dedicated to his students. I soon learned that this dedication was an expression of Kongar-ol’s devotion to Tuva, its culture and its people.

Every time Kongar-ol performed, whether it was in someone’s living room or in a stadium filled with thousands of people, Kongar-ol gave it his all. Mother Teresa said “Give until it hurts, and then give some more.” Kongar-ol did just that.

Though I am deeply saddened by his passing, my life and the world are profoundly enriched because Kongar-ol lived.

 

http://blogs.wsj.com/scene/2013/08/23/the-man-who-brought-tuvan-throat-singing-to-the-world/

This clip, from the “Genghis Blues” DVD, shows Messrs. Ondar and Pena playing a mashup of American blues and throat singing.

OVERTONE SINGING con TRAN QUANG HAI – WORKSHOP DAL 3 ALL’8 OTTOBRE 2014, ROMA, ITALIA


OVERTONE SINGING con TRAN QUANG HAI – WORKSHOP DAL 3 ALL’8 OTTOBRE 2014, ROMA, ITALIA

ROMA, DAL 3 ALL’8 OTTOBRE 2014: WORKSHOP “OVERTONE SINGING”

CON TRAN QUANG HAI 

sei giorni di workshop sul canto armonico con il più

grande esperto mondiale 

dal 3 all’8 ottobre 2014 (dalle ore 15,00 alle ore 19,00)

per un totale di 24 ore.

POSTI LIMITATISSIMI: GLI INTERESSATI POSSONO PREISCRIVERSI ED ASSICURARSI COSI’ LA PRIORITA’ AL MOMENTO DELL’ISCRIZIONE

associazionevoices@gmail.com

Raffinato interprete delle tradizioni musicali dell’Estremo Oriente, maestro di artisti come Demetrio Stratos, Tran Quang Hai è considerato il più grande specialista del mondo di canto difonico (overtones), tecnica vocale di origine sciamanica che permette l’emissione simultanea di due note, diffusa in Mongolia, in Siberia e in Sudafrica.
Tran Quang Hai proviene da una famiglia di cinque generazioni di musicisti.
tranquanghai.info

Refined interpreter of the musical traditions of the Far East, master of artists such as Demetrio Stratos, Tran Quang Hai is considered as the greatest expert in the world of overtone singing (overtone), vocal technique of shamanic origin that allows the simultaneous emission of two notes, widespread in Mongolia, Siberia and South Africa.
Tran Quang Hai comes from a family of five generations of musicians.
More information about him at http://tranquanghai.info  or http://tranquanghai.com
for information about overtone singing at : http://haidiphonie.wordpress.com

This blog is focused on Trân Quang Hai